Do any of y'all know where I can get a retro box?
from JeSuisUnHombre@lemm.ee to retrogaming@lemmy.world on 17 Dec 2023 04:01
https://lemm.ee/post/18235087

My college roommate had this little box that had 2 controllers and RCA’d into the TV that contained basically every game from the most important retro consoles. All the important consoles and games pre y2k. Including Nintendo, Atari, Sega, and maybe some arcade. I assume I can’t get it through normal channels because of some of those roms are unsanctioned, but where might I get something like that? Thanks!

#retrogaming

ElderWendigo@sh.itjust.works on 17 Dec 2023 04:07 next collapse

Buy an nvidia shield. Install retroarch. Find ROMs and put them on a USB drive, plug into shield. Pair any Bluetooth controller(s?). Play all the games.

CmdrShepard@lemmy.one on 17 Dec 2023 04:37 next collapse

It’d be less than half the price to buy a Raspberry Pi 4 and you can even get a custom case.

stoy@lemmy.zip on 17 Dec 2023 05:30 next collapse

Yep, I also ran Retroarch on an RPi 3 and it ran PS1 games fine

PopOfAfrica@lemmy.world on 17 Dec 2023 06:21 next collapse

Right, but I suspect if the user at the top doesn’t know what a Raspberry Pi is, then this is a bad suggestion. Sometimes you just have to recommend the simple stuff for normies.

ElderWendigo@sh.itjust.works on 17 Dec 2023 11:20 next collapse

I’ve done both. The shield is both MUCH MUCH MUCH easier to setup and is so much more powerful than the Pi that N64, PS1, and GameCube Games are more likely to play well. OP didn’t mention being on a budget. They also didn’t mention their Linux skill level. Given thosee facts the shield is worth the price difference. They’re not really saving money if they can’t get the Pi working.

TORFdot0@lemmy.world on 17 Dec 2023 16:57 collapse

A shield gives you access to GeForceNow, Moonlight, as well as streaming services for only about $100 more. Retropi is fine for a single purpose device though. Emulation Station is a much better front end than retroarch

RightHandOfIkaros@lemmy.world on 17 Dec 2023 07:55 collapse

If a Shield is not sourceable, a Mad Catz Mojo or RaspberryPi also works. Personally I recommend Intel NUC but Intel for some reason has decided to not make them like they used to anymore.

jordanlund@lemmy.world on 17 Dec 2023 04:23 next collapse

Most folks make their own with a Raspberry Pi and a “RetroPi” installation. You source the ROMS yourself.

There are pre-loaded kits, but they are many times more expensive than DIY.

$400 on Amazon: a.co/d/ibaXWkT

vs.

Raw board for $80 to kits from $155 to $165:

www.canakit.com/raspberry-pi-5-8gb.html

Then install RetroPi:

retropie.org.uk

And supply ROMS to it.

CmdrShepard@lemmy.one on 17 Dec 2023 04:39 collapse

You don’t need an 8GB Pi for gaming. Most of these run on a 1GB Pi3

jordanlund@lemmy.world on 17 Dec 2023 07:11 collapse

Future proofing. ;)

CorrodedCranium@leminal.space on 17 Dec 2023 05:11 next collapse

Typically Amazon or Ali Express. RetroGamesCorp has created a couple review videos on them.

Even then you could get an old computer (or laptop) and install Lakka on it and just download the ROMs yourself. The whole setup process can be done in a weekend. After that you could just get some cheap knock off Xbox 360 controllers.

Redkey@programming.dev on 17 Dec 2023 09:18 collapse

Yep, this works well. I used to have a cheap, old, secondhand ultralight notebook that I used for work, and I installed Lakka to a tiny bootable USB drive so that on evenings when we planned to gather at one colleague or another’s house after work, I could just throw the drive and a couple of controllers in my bag and we could have a nice, clean, 100% emulation-focused system to game on. Even a 10-year-old laptop with Lakka should smash a Raspberry Pi 4’s cost/performance ratio.

I usually plugged in power and a display, but of course as a laptop it was fine for using on the go, too. Not quite a handheld, but still very portable.

Another option is one of the cheaper ARM-based handhelds with a USB port and HDMI output, so you can still play on a big screen at home. I later got a Retroid 2 for this, which also worked well, but needed a bit more technical fiddling than the Lakka laptop, and couldn’t emulate a few things at full speed. The Retroid 3 should be better, or there are other options such as Ambernic, Game Park, and PowKiddy.

Now, I just use my phone with a Bluetooth controller, and optionally an HDMI output dongle when I’m at home. If your phone doesn’t support HDMI over USB-C natively (mine doesn’t), look into a DisplayLink compatible USB dongle. If you check specs carefully you can even find some that work over USB 2.0 for older/cheaper phones. They have a free app for Android phones.

Rhynoplaz@lemmy.world on 17 Dec 2023 16:22 next collapse

I have EXACTLY what you need! It’s a mini SNES that’s loaded with nearly every ROM from Atari to SNES, and even a few PlayStation and N64 (but they don’t always ruin quite right.

www.ebay.com/itm/115924332838?mkcid=16&mkevt=…

I bought two from this user on eBay. Highly recommend!

Drusas@kbin.social on 18 Dec 2023 00:20 collapse

I adore my mini NES and really wish I had gotten a mini SNES when they came out.

Rhynoplaz@lemmy.world on 18 Dec 2023 01:01 collapse

I originally had the mini NES fully loaded with ROMS, but one of the kids factory reset it. I went shopping for another and found the SNES version.

Don’t tell the kids, but I’m secretly glad they gave me an excuse to upgrade!

Drusas@kbin.social on 18 Dec 2023 01:03 collapse

I was looking at the SNES version just the other day and it's in the hundreds of dollars now.

kotnik@lemmy.sdf.org on 17 Dec 2023 10:37 collapse

Looks like someone is ready to start enjoying retro gaming! For real beginners I recommend Data frog SF2000, for about €15 you get device that can run 6k games (and it arrives with RCA cable too) and doesn’t require poking Retro arch settings. Once hooked you can search and find dedicated device that can run more advanced consoles, can be plugged directly into HDMI port of your TV, etc.